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MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 



AT 



NOR TH ADAMS 



CLASS OF 1965 
PRESENTS 



MOHAWK 




D 



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a 



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MARGARET LANOUE 



Women are the books, the arts, the academies, 
that show, contain, and nourish all the world - - - 

-Shakespeare 





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Get up there! 




Is it basketball 
or ballet? 




Suicide anyone? 



There's a high degree 
of probability that . . 




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Somebody 

does something! 



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61 




rhe Coachmen: Thorn Niles, Jackie Jiacalon 

COACHMEN TO PERFG. 
WINTER CARNIVAL 



Pedagogic Panorama is the 
theme of Winter Carnival, 1965, 
and it is time to get more facts 
about it. Winter Carnival will take 
place one week after the end of 
exams, Jan. 29th, 30th & 31st. 
It comes at an ideal time — all 
the worry of first semester and 
finals is over and the worry of 
second semester hasn't begun to 
hit home yet. Everyone is in the 
mood for some relaxation and fun 
and here it is. ..Winter Carnival. 

As before, every class will 
compete to create the best snow 
sculpture in the contest being 
held starting at the end of finals. 
Also eligible to compete are the 
dorm and any club or organization 
on campus. 

Events Listed 

Friday's events will include, 
besides finishing touches on snow 
sculptures, a toboggan run (to be 
built in back of the school). Fol- 
lowing this activity there will be 
hot cocoa and dancing to records 
in the lounge. 

Saturday is a BIG day. In the 
morning snow sculptures will be 
iudted and the cafe will be ooen 



sac Hall and K 

noon the Winter 

pics will be held in t 

Gym. Last, but" by no ». 

comes the dance Sata s . 

at which the prizes for u**- snow 

sculptures will be awarded and, 

of course, the Queen of Winter 

Carnival crowned. 

Sunday's Events: To top off 
the weekend, the Coachmen from 
Nasson College, in Maine will 
give a concert Sunday afternoon. 
Through necessity, an admission 
of 99<t will be charged for this 
one event. 

Remember, keep the dates of 
January 29th, 30th, & 31st free 
and clear for . . . PEDAGOGIC 
PANORAMA!!! 






My pleasure 



















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We called her "Mother. ' 




Mrs. Mabel Michaels 



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The rmorr\\r)Q a-rfelr 





December 1964 
69 




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A little 
progress 

is better 
than none. 



71 




'All the 
world's a 
stage . 




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77 




LESSOR 



Names 
Li rade g 



Lesson 



L Understandings are general cc 
sing and interpreting the mes 
are in the form of generalize 
comprehensive statements „ (3 
sentences < ) 

Ex Everyday life is abundant 
to use fractional, decime 



Facts and Knowledges; 
HP'acts are events* acts- 
take place or have take 

Knowledges are an accun 
reorganization of facts 

Skills and Abilities s 
"*sHXis are facilities 5 
performances 

EXo in sounding j 
in reoognizir: 
in pronouncir 

Abilities are generaliz 
set of related skills • 
Ex (J to read 
to write 
to evaluate 

Appreciations and Attituc 
Appreciations are likir: 






They 



ere satisfying emc 



Attitudes are likings t 

are satisfying amotions 

Attitudes are relative! 
certain directions and 
patterns o They may be 
knowledges P or emotions 



PIAN 



Dete: 
Subjects-; 

Developmental 
Presentation 
Problem 
Appreciation 

Drill 

Review 

rest 

ncepts that result from organ!- 
rJLngs of given situations Tbey 
bionSy theories s principles s end 
(ley are written in declarative 

in necessities 

L and percent think! rig 

circumstances^ etc c which 
1 place* 

ilation, refinement or 



L specific mental or motor 

>tters 

words 
; words 

d powers to perform an overall 



s for or tendencies to choose, 
ional responses « 

cr or tendencies to choose „ 
responses „ 



rrnu 



rney 



constant tendencies to act in 
i accord with certain mental 
itellectual* based on facts bxh, 
based on appreciations. 





mi sunn mutt 

MOHAWK I 

presents... 1 



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I0HRWK 

t(S(ITS 

««„ BACHELOR '■. ,„ 

gWISE OCTBIIPr S "V-c,,, 

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81 



Dorm Council 




Senior Class? 




please 




ready 




Seniors 
will be 
Seniors 



83 



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87 



The Old 

Order 
Changeth 






ASCOT 




VOL. I - NO. I 



STATE COLLEGE AT NORTH ADAMS 



April 9, 1965 



New Student Association Constitution Proposed 

Controversial Issue Will Be Submitted 
To Student Body Monday 




HAPPY JOURNEY From left to right- Barbara Wassel, Miss Margaret 

Lanoue, Thomas Scharrett, Mr. Frederick Bressette, (Director). 

Three One Act Plays 

by Susan Marble 

Under the general supervision 
of Frederick K. Bressette, an eve- 
ning of short one-act plays was 
presented Wednesday, March 31st 
in the college auditorium at 8 p.m. 

Thornton Wilder's the "Happy 
Journey", directed by Mr. Bres- 
sette, pictured both the imaginary 
and the real world in a delightful 
blending of the two. Conventional 
scenery was discarded to empha- 
size the portrayal of the realistic 
world. Wilder has developed his 
play around the family life of the 
American scene. Depicting this 
typical American family was Miss 
Margaret Lanoue, as Ma Kirby; 
Mr. Andrew Flagg, as Elmer; Bar- 
bara Wassel, as Caroline; Thomas 
Scharrett, as Arthur; Gary Krueger, 
as the gas station attendant, and 
Barbara Sheppard as Beulah. 

Edward Albee's "The Sand- 
box", directed by David Simon, 
was also a picture of the real and 
the imaginary world, as well as 
holding a basic theme of family 
relationships. Because scenery 
was limited, active imagination 
was demanded from those in the 
audience. Albee, though farcical 
on the surface, presents a well- 
based criticism concerning these 
familial relationships. The cast 
included, David Meaney, as the 
young man; Jane King, as Mommy; 



. . . A Review 



Thomas Carty, as Daddy; Deborah 
Clark, as Grandma; and Priscilla 
Ferreira, as the musician. 

After Albee's somewhat tragic 
portrayal of life, Tennessee Wil- 
liams' "The Case of the Crushed 
Petunias" returns us to the idea 
that life is worth living... it is 
wonderful and light. The play is 
a fantasy, but holds truths found 
in Prim and proper Massachusetts. 
The cast consisted of Gloria Mo- 
randi as Dorothy Simple; Richard 
Watson as the officer; David Hyatt 
as the young man; and Susan Mar- 
ble, as Mrs. Dull. This play was 
directed by Louise Gallivan. 



FINANCES AND THE FUTURE 

Mr. Hyman Patashnick spoke 
March 30 on the necessity for 
people planning for the future, to 
invest in mutual stocks. The 
speaker discussed the necessity 
for small buyers to purchase mu- 
tual stocks rather than single is- 
sues, as the best ultimate profits 
rest in the mutuals. He also dis- 
couraged investing money solely 
in insurance policies. A question 
and answer session followed at 
which time areas touched on in the 
twenty minute talk were discussed 
more fully. 



The new Constitution offers a 
long needed change in student 
government for N.A.S.C. The two 
chief changes — more representa- 
tion and student initiated govern- 
ment—will add a community feel- 
ing to our campus. Instead of one 
representative, every class will 
have at least four Senators to con- 
tact and represent their interests. 
This new representation will ex- 
tend the understanding of, interest 
in and democratic attitude toward 
a completely new "experiment in 
self government" here at College. 

These Senators will replace 
the Presidents of our present 
Council in only one capacity — 
that of general college govern- 
ment. In the past, this body func- 
tioned poorly chiefly because of 
the extreme demand on the rela- 
tively few people who held these 
positions who were thereby re- 
quired to organize and, usually 
carry out all the activities for the 
entire student body. Knowledge 
of activities and government now 
will be well dispersed. More will 
be called and most will be chosen. 

These Presidents shall con- 
tinue to exist in their present ca- 
pacity except that they will be 
freer to coordinate and assess 
just how functionally their parti- 
cular group can best serve an en- 
larging college community. They 
shall serve in an advisory capa- 
city to the Senate as an important 
Activities Committee. If they ful- 
fill these important functions of 
their office, they will be doing a 
great service, not only to their 
constituency, but also for the en- 
tire Student Association. 

It is the Senators therefore, 
who will be the general integrating 
body left free to govern in the best 
interests of all. The new govern- 
ment consists of a legislative 
body, the Senate and its various 
committees for college life, four 
self-contained and more active 
class units, and a judiciary of and 
for student responsibility. This is 
not dividing the power of one 
body, it is adding strength and 
efficiency through number into 
three balanced and all encompass- 
ing branches of one government. 

continued on page 7 




David W. Hyatt 

Hyatt Supports Constitution 

The years we spend in college 
are those, which hopefully, will 
be fondly remembered all through 
our lives. A college community, 
like any other society must be or- 
ganized to produce order from 
chaos. Since we all believe in 
democracy and the democratic way 
of life, it is necessary that our 
collegiate society be organized 
in the most democratic manner 
possible, in order to secure maxi- 
mum benefit for the maximum num- 
ber. This is the function of stu- 
dent government. 

The present system includes 
one freshman, two sophomores, 
three juniors and seventeen se- 
niors (all of whom are practice 
teaching for half of their senior 
year). With this arrangement, how 
is it possible to organize an effec- 
tive student government which can 
reach all members of the student 
body? Clearly, it cannot. 

On the basis of my experience, 
I believe that three chief factors 
are required if the organization of 
the student association is to be 
truly effective. They are a strong 
president, who has power to coor- 
dinate all phases of college life 
into an effective whole; the presi- 
dent down through the specific 

continued on page 8 



89 





Dr. Jekyl 



Mr. Hyde 




A-halll 

Caught again 




I said you're shut-off 




91 




Leisure Time? 





So that's 

how it's 

done!! 




Frank Fuller Murdoch 



Honor Society 




Newman 
Club 



Science 
Club 




Christian 
Association 





ASCOT 




VOL. I - NO. II 



STATE COLLEGE AT NORTH ADAMS 



MAY 10, 1965 



Hall Elected New President of Student Assn. 

RECORD TURNOUT FOR 

INTERESTING ELECTION 

Apathy at State College has 
suffered a severe set back. Eighty 
percent of the student body veiled 
for the officers of the Student 
Senate under the new constitution. 

The enthusiasm of the candi- 
dates, apparent, by the many post- 
ers throughout the school, was 
matched by the tremendous man- 
date of the student body. 






From left to right, Or. John Gillespie, President Free). 

DIRECTOR OF STATE COLLEGES 
SPEAKS AT HONORS ASSEMBLY 



Photo by Oldfield 



During the Annual Honors As- 
sembly held Tuesday, April 27, in 
the Stale College Auditorium, an 
audience of 250 faculty and stu- 
dents heard Dr. John Gillespie, 
Director of the State Colleges in 
Massachusetts, speak on "Crea- 
tivity, and Its Importance in Tea- 
chers and Their Students". His 
remarks and conclusions were very 
well received by the enthusiastic 
audience. 

Dr. Gillespie aptly addressed 
the group who attended the Honors 
Assembly in the college auditori- 
um on April 27. by urging the stu- 
dents to cultivate creativity and 
individuality within themselves 
and within those around them. 

He expressed the view tha 
young teachers are moving into an 
age of explosions. Ten new tea 
chers should be trained eac' 
to contend with the tro"- 
population ex| 
this tumi'i'- 



of knowledge. This expanse is 
perhaps most indicative of the 
burdens placed upon new teachers. 
All this knowledge we gain is 
soon to be found obsolete and 
often incorrect. Knowledge is our 
business, and we must keep 
abreast of it. The teacher must 
maintain his creativity, be a serv- 
ant of the creativity existing with- 
in his students, and provide the 
proper atmosphere for the stimula- 
tion of this creativity. 

A creative person must be 
flexible and adaptable. To be 
creative students, teachers, and 
adults, we must read, and exercise 
more div( i sified thinking. 

An interesting point Dr. 
pie brought out was * u -s,j 
creative s!< - 1 », 
apiJ^lrin 





JOHN GUERCIO- Vice-President 

John Guercio is the new Vice- 
President of the Student Associa- 
tion. John, svho has only recently 
come to us plans to keep his mind 
on tin; pulse of the general col- 
lege life and activities ai NASC 
as the person next in charge dur- 
ing the President's absences He 
will try 



JOHN HALL - President 

Next year the Student - 
will be presided over by the newlj 
elected President, -John Hall. The 
new President feels that the hard- 
est obstacle to overcome will be 
convincing the students to take a 
deeper interest in the affairs of 
the college. Mr. Hall has served 
in student government before and 
also was a member of the commit- 
tee that formulated the tu ■ 
stiiutioji. He believes that the 
uineiit will create a strong 
foundation on which to build. 
Aiit.h the new constitution and 
1 orovisions, Mr. Hall 
lout-faculty reia- 
that the 
iye 



«mertcQn Uni 
olleges. 

Continued on p<3g£ > 




>e SUCC 

While in OTul 
oeeome acquainted wish 
nearly every student at 
Adams State in "both a represen 
tative and non-representative ca. 
paeity." 



Pres 

to see that" 





made a personal inspection of all dorm rooms last Friday, and upon 
finding that many rooms had items tacked or pasted to the walls and window shades, 
issued an order that all girls in the rooms involved be campused from April 23rd 
through April 28th. As you know, there is a notice on each dorm bulletin board speci- 
fying clearly that tacking or pasting anything on the walls is forbidden. 





07 




Parents' Day 



1965 










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Get 



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That waiting game . . 





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Jns C/aiA or 

J\ instssn cHundxsa ana <Six.tu-jlus 

ofi/U 

<^>tats Collsqs 

at enloitk crraamt., dv\ai.ixxcnui.etts. 

zequeiti. tne honox of uouz hxeience 

at tU 

Commzncs.ms.nt cZxs.xcii.si. 

JiaccaLa.uie.ate., (June 6 at 3 h.m. 

graduation, ,-iune 13 at 3 h.m. 



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Senior Prom 






Senior Class Banquet 

AT 

BRODIE MOUNTAIN 
New Ashford, Mass. 

Saturday, June 12, 1965 

6:30 - 12:00 P.M. 

Dance Band 

Social Hour ■ 6:30 p.m. — Dinner served - 7:30 p.m 

$4.25 per person 



tax and tip included 



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109 




Hurry 







Mr. President! 



Where do I sit? 



May I 

make a 
suggestion! 



i in 




How 




III 





Confusion 



Why did it have to rain?!? 





Where's my mortarboard? 



What do I do with 

my hat . . . Ops! Cover 



*F-T 




These 8 Graduates 
Types Who Finish 
What They Start 

The eight tots entering kinder- 
garten together in 1948 had no 
idea of when or where they 
would earn college degrees. 

But yesterday the eight, now 
college seniors 21 or 22 years 
old, marched down the same 
aisle and mounted the same 
stage to pick up diplomas at 
North Adams State College. 
At Marks School 

In September of 1948 they en- 
rolled in a kindergarten class at 
Mark Hopkins School here, be- 
ginning the studies that led to 
the bachelor's degrees in educa- 
tion they received yesterday. 

They were split up several 
times over the past 16 years, 
some of them switching gram- 
mar schools and others choos- 
ing different high schools. 

"But," mused a State College 



official yesterday, "they all man- 
aged to wrap it up together." 

One of the eight, Patricia A. 
Girgenti, won the college's two 
top academic awards and a sum- 
ma cum laude diploma. 

The others are Timothy J. 
Bergendahl, Harold Gitelson, 
James A. Meaney, James F. 
Rhodes, Kathleen A. Scully, Jo- 
anne Troia and Ann E. Cain. 




113 





I 14 



lUOllllglrll 



iu v> pis tin ni uiuuuciuun jumw 10 

UNDER SECRETARY OF HEALTH 

EDUCATION AND WELFARE TO GIVE 

COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS 




Ivan A. Nestingen, under sec- 
retary of Health, Education and 
Welfare, . will be the speaker at 
the 66th annual graduation at 
North Adams State College exer- 
cises scheduled for 3 p.m. Sun- 
day, June 13, Dr. Eugene L. 
Freel, president, said in announc- 
ing the plans for commencement 
week for the class of 1965. 

The Baccalaureate has been 
scheduled for 3 p.m. Sunday, June 
6 in Hoosac Hall Auditorium. The 
Rev. Lafayette H. Sprague, Jr., 
Rector of St. John's Episcopal 
Church of North Adams will be 
the speaker at the Baccalaureate, 
Dr. Freel said. This event is 
open to the public. 

The commencement exercises 
will be held in the Taconic Hall 
Gardens, weather permitting, and 
will be open to the public with 
seats reserved by ticket. In the 
event of inclement weather, this 
ceremony will be held in Hoosac 
Hall Auditorium where admission 
will be by ticket only. 

Secy. Nestingen, a lawyer by 
profession, is a native of the 
State of Wisconsin where he prac- 
ticed law in the law firm of Ar- 
thur, Dewa, Nestingen, & Tom- 
linson in Madison, Wisconsin un- 
til he was elected the Mayor of 
Madison in April 1956. 

Mr. Nestingen has had exten- 
sive governmental experience 
which began in 1951 when he be 
came a member of the Madison 
Common Council. He was later 
elected a member of the Wiscon- 
sin Assembly before he was 
elected the mayor of his home 
city. He was reelected mayor ol 
Madison twice before his third 
term expired in 1961. 

The U. S. Health, Education, 
and Welfare official has been ac- 
tive in the Democratic party ir 
Wisconsin since 1949. He has 
been chairman of the Kennedy foi 
president club of Wisconsin anc 
chairman of the Citizens for Ken- 
nedy-Johnson of Wisconsin group. 

Mr. Nestingen served in Work 
War II overseas in the south Pa- 
cific. He received two degrees 
from the University of Wisconsir 



117 




'And we glory in the title of United States 





Marines ' 





R. C. Spraque Award 




Summa cum Laude 




RONALD ALLEN ALPERT 

Secondary 

Student Voice; Kappa Delta Phi; M.A.A.; 
Stunt Night; S.N.E.A.; Intramural Basket- 
ball 



ELIZABETH (TOWNSEND) ASHLEY 

Science-Math 

Cheerleader; Current Events; W.R.A. Con- 
ference; Orientation Committee; MOHAWK; 
Intramural Sports; Winter Carnival Decora- 
tions Chairman, 3; Glee Club; W.R.A. ; 
Christian Association 





PETER RICHARD AUSTIN 

Science-Math 
Stunt Night; Intramural Basketball; Junior 
Class Public Relations Officer; M.A.A.; 

S.N.E.A. 



EDMUND THOMAS BERCURY, JR. 

Secondary 

M.A.A.; Stunt Night 





TIMOTHY JOSEPH BERGENDAHL 

Science-Math 
Baseball; Stunt Night; Orientation Commit- 
tee; Science Club, President, 4; M.A.A.; 
Student Council 



WARREN EDWARD BOHLMAN 

Science-Math 

Debating Club; Young Republican Club, 
Vice-President, 4; M.A.A. 




DANIEL PATRICK BOYLE, JR. 

Secondary 
M.A.A. 



KATHLEEN DELIA BRANAGAN 

Elementary 
Orientation Court, 1; W.R.A.; Tennis Di- 
rector; Winter Carnival Court, 3 






JOAN (MAYNARD) BUSHIKA 

Secondary 

Honor Society, Treas. 4; W.R.A.; MO- 
HAWK 



ANN ELIZABETH CAIN 
Elementary 

Glee Club; Pres. 4; Student Council Christ- 
mas Party, Chairman; W.R.A.; Orientation 
Committee, Newman Club 





TIMOTHY FRANCIS CARROLL 

Secondary 

M.A.A., Pres.; Student Council; Varsity 
Basketball; Kappa Delta Phi 



DEBORAH S. CLARK 

Secondary 
Spring Play; Student Faculty Play; Harle- 
quin; Vice-pres. ; Delta Psi Omega, Pres.; 
W.R.A. 






v J 




MARION ELIZABETH CLARK 

Science-Math 
Science Club; Taconah; S.N.E.A.; W.R.A. 



SHARON ANNE COLLINS 

Elementary 
Orientation Q ue en, \- Newman Club; 
W.R.A. ; MOHAWK; Orientation Comm.; 
S.N.E.A.; Stunt Night; Intramural Sports 



JOAN PATRICIA CONDRON 

Elementary 
Stunt Night; W.R.A.; Current Events 





* ^ 



/* 



ROBERT MARSHALL COOLIDGE 

Secondary 

Stunt Night; MOHAWK; Jr. Class Treas- 
urer; Bookstore; Soph. Prom, Program Com- 
mittee Chairman, 2; Band; M.A.A.; Orien- 
tation Committee; S.N.E.A. 



w 



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NORMAN SEBASTIAN D'AMICO 

Secondary 
Newman Club; Current Events; M.A.A. 



GAIL MARGARET DAVIDSON 

Elementary 
Dorm Council, President, 4; Student Coun- 
cil; Christian Association; W.R.A. ; Intra- 
mural Sports; Ski Club; Harlequin; MO- 
HAWK 





DANIEL FRANCIS DeBLOIS 

Science-Math 

Intramural Basketball; Science 
M.A.A. 



Club; 




WALLACE JAMES DESAUTELS 

Science-Math 

Varsity Basketball; Varsity Baseball; 
S.N.E.A.; M.A.A. 



I?A 




. 



LYDIA ANN DUBE 

Science-Math 
Science Club, Sec; S.N.E.A.; Intramural 
Sports; W.R.A. 




WILLIAM F. DUFFY 
Secondary 

M.A.A., Vice-pres., 3, Pres. 4; Kappa Delta 
Phi; Student Council; Intramural Coach; 
Class vice pres. 2, 3 

WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN COLLEGES 
AND UNIVERSITIES 





CHARLES W. EASTMAN 

Science-Math 
M.A.A.; Intramural Sports; Chess Club 



GEORGE A. FITZPATRICK 

Secondary 

M.A.A.; Kappa Delta Phi; Varsity Basket- 
ball 








GEOFFREY ERROL FREER 

Secondary 

MAA, Treasurer 3, 4; Stunt Night; Soccer; 
Baseball; Intramural Basketball; S.N.E.A. 






LOUISE GALLIVAN 

Secondary 
W.R.A.; Harlequin; Delta 
Honor Society 



Psi Omega ; 





ROBERT JOHN GENTILE 

Secondary 
Class President, 1, 2; Honor Society; Book- 
store; Student Council; Orientation Commit- 
tee; S.N.E.A.; M.A.A. 
WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN COLLEGES 
AND UNIVERSITIES 







DEANNA R. GERREN 

Elementary 
W.R.A. Class Representative 



128 





PATRICIA ANN GIRGENTI 
Elementary 

Honor Society, Vice President 4; Class Sec- 
retary 4; MOHAWK; Cheerleader, Captain 
3; S.N.E.A.; W.R.A. 



HAROLD GITELSON 

Secondary 
Intramural Basketball; Taconah; Stunt 
Night; M.A.A.; Student Voice 





ROGER KENNETH GOODELL 

Secondary 
Stunt Night; Intramural Baseball; Soccer, 
Co-Captain 4; Kappa Delta Phi; M.A.A. 




JANET AGNES GRANGER 

Elementary 
W.R.A. ; Stunt Night 



fa 



FRANCIS PATRICK GRAY 

Secondary 
Current Events Gub; Newman Club, Presi- 
dent 4; M.A.A. 




LAWRENCE HENRY GROSS, JR. 

Secondary 

Class President, 3, 4; Honor Society; Stu- 
dent Council; M.A.A. ; Kappa Delta Phi, 
Secretary, 4; Intramural Sports; Parents 
Day 

WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN COLLEGES 
AND UNIVERSITIES 





EVELYNNE ANNE HATTAWAY 
Elementary 

Honor Society; Stunt Night; Student Coun- 
cil, Secretary, 4; Christian Association; 
W.R.A.; S.N.E.A.; NETPA Conference 
WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN COLLEGES 
AND UNIVERSITIES 



DOROTHY ANN HAWKES 

Elementary 
Honor Society; W.R.A.; Stunt Night; Glee 
Club, Secretary-Treasurer, 3, Vice-President, 

4 



no 





JOSEPH HOLLOWAY 

Secondary 

S.N.E.A.; Golf Team; Intramural Basket- 
ball ; Taconah ; Circle K 



JANET ELIZABETH HOLWAY 
Elementary 

Glee Club; Christian Association; Current 
Events; S.N.E.A.; W.R.A.; MOHAWK, 
Parents Day Committee 





DONALD L. HORTON 

Secondary 

Statesmen; Taconah, Editor; Honor Society; 
Student Voice; Student Council; M.A.A.; 
Debating Team; Young Republicans 



DAVID W. HYATT 

Secondary 
M.A.A.; Student Council, President, 4; Gr- 
cle K; Kappa Delta Phi; Orientation Com- 
mittee; S.N.E.A.; Harlequin; Soccer; Intra- 
mural Basketball; Stunt Night; Mass. S.C. 
Student Gov. Assoc, Pres.; Delta Psi Ome- 
ga; Spring Play; Parent's Day Committee 
WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN COLLEGES 
AND UNIVERSITIES 







DAVID SOUZA JARDIN 
Secondary 

M.A.A.; Intramural Sports; Varsity Base- 
ball; Kappa Delta Phi 



SANDRA GRACE JILLSON 

Secondary 
W.R.A. ; Glee Club; Graduation Marshal 




BRIAN JOSEPH JURKOWSKI 

Science-Math 

M.A.A.; Debating Club, Treas., 3; Science 
Club; Intramural Sports; Snow Sculpture, 
Chairman 



Shyj 



RONALD KENDRICK 

Science-Math 
M.A.A.; Honor Society; Science Club 




m 




DAVID RICHARD KINNE 
Secondary 

Varsity Basketball; Intramural 
M.A.A. 



Sports; 



JOSETTA PATRICIA KNOPF 

Elementary 

Glee Club; Newman; Club, Public Relations 
Officer; Dorm Council; Sophomore Class, 
Public Relations Officer; Orientation Com- 
mittee; Spring Play; Harlequin, Public Re- 
lations Officer; MOHAWK 





MARGARET ELIZABETH KURPIEL 

Science-Math 

Science Club, Treasurer, 3, 4; Mathematics 
Achievement Award 1963-4; Honor Society, 
Treasurer; Eastern States Science Confer- 
ence Delegate; W.R.A.; S.N.E.A.; Science 
Fair 



KAREN LOUISE LANE 

Science-Math 

W.R.A.; Intramural Sports; W.R.A. Play- 
day; Stunt Night; Mountain Day; Senior 
Class Treasurer; S.N.EA. 






ROBERT G. LASHER 
Secondary 

Stunt Night; S.N.E.A.; Statesmen; MO- 
HAWK; M.A.A. 



ANTHONY STANLEY LENGOWSKI 
Secondary 

Varsity Soccer; Stunt Night; Current Events 
Club, Treasurer, 4; Honor Society; Orienta- 
tion Committee; M.A.A. 




DAVID JAMES LENNON 

Secondary 
Current Events Club; M.A.A. 



ROBERT PAUL LINTON 

Science-Math 
Intramural Basketball; Kappa Delta Phi, 
President; M.A.A., Vice-President; Orienta- 
tion Committee 



134 





NANCY JANET MAHAR 

Elementary 
W.R.A.; Intramural Sports 



DONALD ARTHUR MARLOW 

Science-Math 

Intramural Sports; Orientation Committee, 
chairman ; Honor Society 
WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN COLLEGES 
AND UNIVERSITIES 





JANET LORRAINE MARR 

Elementary 

W.R.A.; MOHAWK; Dorm Council; Intra- 
mural Sports; Christian Assoc; Stunt 
Night; S.N.E.A.; Parent's Day Committee 



DONALD JAMES MARRA 

Secondary 
M.A.A. 





BRENDA LANCASTER MARSHALL 

Elementary 
Christian Association; W.R.A. 



JANICE IRENE MARSHALL 

Elementary 

Stunt night; Intramural Sports; Dorm Coun- 
cil, Treas., 3; W.R.A. ; S.N.E.A. 





carole McDonald 

Science-Math 

Glee Club; W.R.A.; Taconah; Harlequin 
Ring Committee; S.N.E.A., Sec. -treas., 4 
Christian Assoc, Vice-pres., 3, President, 4 
Intramural Sports, Student Council, MO 
HAWK 



THOMAS McGILL 

Secondary 
Student Voice; Intramural Basketball 



IU 



Camera 
Shy I 




ffft% ' 




WILLIAM MERTON McNEIL 

Secondary 

Orientation Committee; Kappa Delta Phi, 
Vice President, 4; Varsity Soccer, Co-cap- 
tain, 4; Intramural Basketball; Stunt Night; 
Senior Class Vice President; M.A.A. 



JAMES A. MEANEY 

Secondary 

Varsity Basketball; Varsity Baseball; 
Night; Intramural Sports; M.A.A. 



Stunt 





WILLIAM LAWRENCE MILLER, 

Science-Math 
Honor Society; S.N.E.A.; M.A.A. 



JR. 



PETER E. MORRILL 

Secondary 

Varsity Baseball; Varsity Soccer; Stunt 
Night; '"Spring Play;" Kappa Delta Phi, 
Alumni Secretary, 3, Treasurer 2; Orienta- 
tion Committee; Christmas Play; Delta Psi 
Omega; Harlequin; M.A.A. 





ROBERT ROY MOULTON 

Science-Mathematics 
S.N.E.A.; M.A.A.; Science Club 




DAVID ALLEN MURLEY 
Secondary 

Current Events Club, President 4, Secretary 
2; Public Relations 2; Kappa Delta Phi; 
Student Council; MOHAWK; S.N.E.A.; 
Kappa Delta Phi, Public Relations Offi- 
cer, Pledgemaster; M.A.A.; Stunt Night; 
Parent's Day Committee 





JOSEPH BARTON NEILEY 

Secondary 
Intramural Basketball, M.A.A. 



CATHERINE McGREGOR OLDHAM 

Science-Math 

Glee Club; W.R.A.; Intramural Sports; 
Cantebury Club; S.N.E.A.; MOHAWK 



nft 





CAROL ANN PANNESCO 

Secondary 
W.R.A. 



MICHAEL FRANCIS PENSIVY, JR. 

Secondary 

M.A.A.; Vice President, Music Club; Glee 
Club; Statesmen; Chairman, Band Commit- 
tee 





CHARLOTTE LOUISE PIKE 

Elementary 
W.R.A. ; Intramural Sports; MOHAWK 



GRACE KATHLEEN POMEROY 

Secondary 
W.R.A.; Intramural Sports 





BESTY HARLENE QUINN 

Elementary 

Glee Club; S.N.E.A.; Christian Association; 
Honor Society; Cheerleader; W.R.A. 



CAROLYN J. REED 

Secondary 

Glee Club; Newman Club; S.N.E.A.; Intra- 
mural Sports; W.R.A. ; MOHAWK 










t 




A. LINDA REYNOLDS 

Secondary 
Taconah; W.R.A.; Current Events Club 







140 



JAMES FREDERICK RHODES 

Secondary 
Platoon Leaders Class U.S.M.C; Soccer; 
Student Voice; Intramural Sports; Track 
Team, 2nd place New England Small Col- 
lege Track Conference; Ring Committee; 
Commissioned 2nd Lieutenant, U.S.M.C. 
WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN COLLEGES 
AND UNIVERSITIES 



XI 




RICHARD FRANCIS ROBERTS 

Secondary 
M.A.A.; Orientation Committee; Kappa Del- 
ta Phi; Glee Club 



FRANCIS GIRARD RYAN 

Elementary 

M.A.A.; Soccer; Honor Society, President; 
Student Voice; Student Council 





CAROLYN SANBORN RYDER 

Elementary 

Class Secretary (2); Sophomore Prom; 
Queen, Christian Association, Vice Presi- 
dent; Glee Club; Honor Society; MO- 
HAWK; Orientation Committee 




THOMAS WILLIAM SCHARRETT 

Secondary 
M.A.A.; Soccer; Chess Club; Harlequin 




'W^ 



KATHLEEN ANN SCULLY 
Elementary 

Glee club; Orientation Committee; W.R.A. 
Newman Club; S.N.E.A. 








CAROL ANN SEYMOUR 
Elementary 

Student Council; Treas., 4, Assist. Treas., 3; 
Newman Club; S.N.E.A.; Orientation Com- 
mittee; Class Treasurer 1, 2; W.R.A. ; Soph. 
Prom Queen's Court; Winter Carnival 
Queen's Court; Winter Carnival Queen 4; 
Stunt Night; Mass. S.C. Student Gov. As., 
Treas. 

WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN COLLEGES 
AND UNIVERSITIES 




CORNELIUS MICHAEL SHANAHAN 

Secondary 
Circle K Club; M.A.A. 



CLAIRE ELIZABETH SHEA 

Secondary 
W.R.A., V. Pres., 3; Pres., 4; Harlequin; 
Delta Psi Omega, Sec, 4; Orientation Com- 
mittee, Sec., 4 





RAYMOND ARTHUR SHEPARDSON 

Secondary 
Intramural basketball; M.A.A.; Honor So- 
ciety 



HELEN ROSE SICILIANO 

Elementary 
W.R.A.; Soccer Director; S.N.E.A.; Intra- 
mural Sports 





BARBARA ANN SIDES 

Elementary 
W.R.A.; Dorm Council. Treas., 4; Intra- 
mural Sports; MOHAWK 




CARLETON JAMES SMITH, 3rd 
Secondary 

Baseball; Kappa Delta Phi; Orientation 
Committee; Student Council, Vice-Pres., 4; 
M.A.A. 



*9> 



*^ 



PATRICIA ANNE SMITH 
Elementary 

Intramural sports; S.N.E.A.; Newman Club; 
Stunt Night; Ring Committee; MOHAWK, 
Public Relations; W.R.A. 




MARGARET ANNE SPAFFORD 
Elementary 

Glee Club; Christian Association; Class 
Representative; W.R.A. ; S.N.E.A. 





MARTHA HELEN SPOFFORD 

Elementary 

Christian Association; W.R.A.; S.N.E.A.; 
MOHAWK 




STANLEY MICHAEL STEFANIK 

Science-Math 

Stunt Night; Science Club; Student Coun- 
cil; Student Voice; M.A.A. 




, 



J m 

Camera 
Shy! 




EDWARD ARTHUR STEVENS, JR. 

Secondary 
M.A.A. 



ROBERT E. TALLARICO 

Science-Math 
Honor Society; Current Events Club; Young 
Democrats; M.A.A. 





DAVID ANTHONY TOMASSINI 

Secondary 
M.A.A. 



JO-ANNE TROIA 

Secondary 

Honor Society; W.R.A.; MOHAWK; Cheer- 
leader; Intramural Sports 




MELBA P. VIEIRA 

Science-Math 
Harlequin; Current Events Gub, Sec, 4; 
Senior Class Public Relations; Stunt Night; 
Glee Club; W.R.A.; S.N.E.A. 










ALLAN A. VIELE 

Science-Math 

M.A.A.; Physics Achievement Award (1962- 
1963) 








ALAN CHARLES VINCELETTE 

Secondary 

Stunt Night; M.A.A.; Intramural basket- 
ball 




CAROL ANN WATERS 
Elementary 

Canterbury Club; Soph. Prom, Queen's 
Court; Dorm Council; W.R.A.; Intramural 
Sports; Newman Club 




146 




RICHARD ALAN WATSON 

Secondary 

Harlequin, President; 3, 4; Delta Psi Ome- 
ga; Student Council; Spring Play; M.A.A.; 
Winter Carnival, Entertainment Chairman, 3 



FRANCINE (HODECKER) WILSON 

Elementary 
Honor Society; Glee Club; W.R.A. 








BERTON G. YEATON, JR. 

Science-Math 
M.A.A. 






DENNIS P. ZICKO 

Science-Math 

Intramural, Basketball; Circle K; Student 
Council; Student Voice; Stunt Night; 
Track; Debating Society, Secretary, 3, Pres- 
ident, 4; Science Club; M.A.A. 








DOLORES ANN ZIEMINSKI 
Secondary 

Taconah, Editor,. 3; Student Council; 
S.N.E.A.; W.R.A. 



FRANCIS ZOLTEK 

Secondary 

Baseball; Basketball; M.A.A.; Orientation 
Committee 




148 



As a parting gesture, the Mohawk Staff would like to ex- 
tend its gratitude to the following for their advice and co- 
operation: 



The Faculty and student body of N.A.S.C. 

Mazzuchi Studio and Camera Shop 

"Moses" 

NASCOT 

North Adams Transcript 

Mrs. F. V. Rhodes 

Mr. Morton Schiff 

The Student Voice 

Taylor Yearbook Company 

Vantine Studios 



And a special note of thanks to 

Mrs. Ellen Schiff 

for her patience and great understanding 



149 




.m TAYLOR PUBLISHING COMPANY 

"The World's Best Yearbooks Are Taylor-made" 



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